Helping yourself

Helping yourself

Helping yourself
  • Self-help guides: Northumberland, Tyne and Wear NHS Foundation Trust have some useful self-help guides covering a range of mental health issues such as anxiety, depression, and sleep. Click here for information.
  • Self-help website: ‘Think about your life’ is a website which has practical help tools to help people deal with their feelings. From its home page, you can select ‘Living well with cancer’ for tools specifically designed for people who have experienced cancer. Click here for information.
  • Macmillan: Macmillan have an excellent website with plenty of information and resources on a variety of issues such as coping with emotions, changes to body image, relationships and sex and talking about cancer. You can also find out what support there is available in this area as well as resources. Click here for information.
  • Relax: When feeling stressed or anxious, one of our body’s natural responses is to feel tension. Relaxation can be a helpful skill to learn to let go of that tension. Click here for some relaxation exercises you can download for free and try.
  • Mindfulness: Being mindful just means being able to pay attention to whatever is going on in the present moment, non-judgementally. Mindfulness can be a useful practice to deal with worry and uncertainty about the future. If you can practice being mindful, this will increase awareness, clarity and acceptance of whatever is going on for you in the present moment without getting caught up in worries or problems that you can’t solve.Click here for more information on mindfulness including free downloads of meditations you can try.

    You can also download the Headspace app for smartphones or go to the Headspace website for a 10 day free trial of 10 minute meditations which are a great introduction to mindfulness practice. Click here for more information.

  • After treatment reading: People sometimes find it helpful to read about what others’ experiences are like after they have finished treatment to give them a sense of what is ‘normal’. Dr Peter Harvey, Consultant Clinical Psychologist, has written an article about what it feels like for a lot of people when treatment finishes; what feelings you may encounter and what it’s like dealing with uncertainty for example. Click here to read it.
  • Emotional health and cancer booklet: This booklet on common emotions after a cancer diagnosis includes a variety of evidence-based strategies and tools to help you manage these emotions. Everyone is different but with time and practice you may find some of these skills helpful in improving your emotional health. Click here to read it.